Larry Grenadier

Welcome  to the site of Jazz Bassist Larry Grenadier.  (Photo credit: Pat Kepic)

As one of contemporary jazz’s most respected and accomplished bassists, Larry Grenadier has built an expansive body of work that encompasses a variety of significant projects with many of the genre’s most inventive and influential musicians.  Over the course of a performing and recording career that spans three decades, he’s earned a far-reaching reputation, for his instrumental talent, for his instantly recognizable tone, and for the sensitivity, imagination and creative curiosity that have established him as an in-demand sideman and valued collaborator…..continue reading BIOGRAPHY

 

Larry Grenadier to perform with Chris Potter in February and March.

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Larry will be performing with Chris Potter in support of Chris’s release ‘The Sirens‘ on ECM Records.  The group launches on February 5th for the week at the Village Vanguard in New York City and will feature Chris, Larry, Ethan Iverson (Piano) and Eric Harland (drums, Feb 6, 7, 8, 9) or Adam Cruz (drums, Feb 5, 10).

To learn their itinerary, visit Chris Potter’s EVENT page.

 

 

 

FLY: Year of the Snake on ECM now available!

Click on image to order your copy.

“Formed eight years ago by drummer Jeff Ballard with fellow Brad Mehldau partner Larry Grenadier on bass and saxophonist Mark Turner(one of the most resourceful and independent sax newcomers of the last decade), the New York trio Fly is an exchange between equals, not a sax-led charge over a rhythm section…Year of the Snake is up there with Fly’s best work, with its rustling fast grooves and languid horn lines, and pieces that open on almost impossibly pure high-register long tones. The swaying Salt and Pepper is as coolly jazzy a piece as any diehard could wish for, and a glide over fizzy drumming on the title track turns into a patiently spun improvisation. Grenadier’s lovely tone and Ballard’s blend of subtle textural playing and whiplash power complete one of the great contemporary jazz small groups.” – John Fordham, The Guardian